US asks China to provide verifiable proof of Chinese tennis star's whereabouts

The report said that the Biden administration wants China to "provide independent, verifiable proof" of her whereabouts. 35 years old Peng Shuai, the two time Grand Slam winner, went missing after she accused the ex-Chinese official of sexual assault two weeks ago. Raising their voice on the issue, the Women's Tennis Association warns the Chinese authority to pull the upcoming tennis events out of china.

The United States is "deeply concerned" about Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai, who went missing after making sexual assault allegations against a top Communist Party official according to a report by BBC.

The report said that the Biden administration wants China to "provide independent, verifiable proof" of her whereabouts.

35 years old Peng Shuai, the two time Grand Slam winner, went missing after she accused the ex-Chinese official of sexual assault two weeks ago.

Raising their voice on the issue, the Women's Tennis Association warns the Chinese authority to pull the upcoming tennis events out of china.

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There will be no competitions in China next year without proof that Peng was safe, said the WTA Chairman Steve Simon to BBC.

"We cannot stand by compromises. This is a right and wrong issue," he said, the report said.

Speaking on the claims made by the Chinese Tennis Association, that Peng is safe and is in Beijing, Simon said that there has been no confirmation that is true


In a separate development on Friday, three photos of Peng were posted on a WeChat account under her name with the caption "Happy Weekend".

However, the authenticity of the post on the Chinese instant messaging service was questioned, BBC reported.

Earlier this week, Chinese state media released an email attributed to Ms Peng, but Simon cast doubt about its authenticity.

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The former number one-ranked doubles player has not been seen in public since posting an allegation about former Vice-Premier Zhang Gaoli on Chinese social media site Weibo on 2 November.

She alleged she was "forced" into sexual relations with Mr Zhang -- who served as the country's vice-premier between 2013 and 2018, the report said.