Vegetable prices soar in Delhi, consumers feel pinch

Tomatoes and green peas, considered as the main constituents of Indian food,  are among the costliest vegetables.  The retail prices of green peas on online grocery delivery platforms have soared to Rs 200-250 per kg in Delhi and the prices are Rs 120 at the local mandis.

Retail prices of vegetables in national capital Delhi has witnessed a significant surge, prices are expected to continue to rise further in the coming few days.

Tomatoes and green peas, considered as the main constituents of Indian food,  are among the costliest vegetables. 

The retail prices of green peas on online grocery delivery platforms have soared to Rs 200-250 per kg in Delhi and the prices are Rs 120 at the local mandis.

The price of tomato per kg is between Rs 80 and Rs 90 on the online market, while in the retail market it is selling for Rs 70 per kg.

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The price rise is due to a delay in the procurement of peas from Punjab, according to news agency IANS sources at the Agriculture Produce Market Committee (APMC). The prices will settle down in four to five days' time, the news agency report added.

Hari Om, a vegetable vendor, said that vegetables prices have gone up as local supply has been stopped.

He said that tomatoes are now coming from Bengaluru, which is also a reason for the price rise.

The retail prices of vegetables had picked up by 14.2 per cent in October over the previous month.

Cauliflower now costs Rs 50-60 per kg in the local markets, while beans cost Rs 70-80 per kg. The prices of other vegetables like potato, egg plant and okra, among others, have also gone up in the national capital, despite the fact that the expectation of record horticulture crop production during 2020-21 might cushion the availability of vegetables and fruits.

Rajdev Shah, a vegetable seller in the Ghazipur mandi, said that he is also feeling the pinch of skyrocketing vegetable prices, as the customers are finding it hard to buy vegetables at such high rates.

Ruby, a consumer, said that the price rise has affected her kitchen budget.

"We have cut our needs almost by half as our budget doesn't allow us to buy such expensive vegetables," she said.

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The price rise is reportedly caused mainly by supply disrupting factors such as extreme weather and rise in diesel price.

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