Indian silhouettes for a global mindset

Staying true to her expertise in playing Indian styles with a distinct global appeal, designer Payal Singhal launched her latest collection 'Kismet' on Day 4 of the ongoing FDCI x LFW phygital showcase. Bollywood actress Athiya Shetty was the showstopper for the designer.

Staying true to her expertise in playing Indian styles with a distinct global appeal, designer Payal Singhal launched her latest collection 'Kismet' on Day 4 of the ongoing FDCI x LFW phygital showcase. Bollywood actress Athiya Shetty was the showstopper for the designer.

Focusing on catering to the interests of Gen--Z, the 'Indian athleisure' collection included bohemian and relaxed silhouettes which revolved around lounge wear-cum-street wear. The designer collaborated with R|Elan to source the fabric that ranged from fluid FreeFlow BSY, luscious SuperFeel filament yarn, FreeFlow -- exclk, and GreenGold made from used PET bottles.

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There were kurta-jogger sets, and coordinates, along with slinky dhoti saris, cropped-top jogger saris and balloon lehengas, with tops and flowing dupattas.

The designer has also played with colours and patterns, with the use of the digital evil eye inspired ikats; quirky mosaic patterns and the classic florals. There was use of Pitta kora work, intricate cut Dana, along with thread and wool embroidery and tassels.

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Singhal said: "It's impossible to ignore the times we are living in when designing a collection now. We've spent the past year in kaftans and loungewear, they have become wardrobe essentials! The DNA of the brand has always been to revisit Indian silhouettes with a global mindset so that they are not limited by season or occasions, but instead are all-encompassing with a focus on comfort."

She added: "The next wave of clothing is all about minimal maximalism -- which means that even when dressed to the nines, there will be a need for ease in silhouettes and fabrics. This collection is a unique take on Indian wear merged with loungewear that I've never done before. It is also heavily inspired by how I dress -- I don't have separate Indian and western wear wardrobes. My personal style is all about making transitional pieces work together no matter the occasion."

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